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Companion planting for the optimal garden, in Windows 10

We’re in the transition seasons in both hemispheres right now: autumn in the south, and spring in the north. This is a good time to establish a new crop of plants before the conditions get too harsh in the peak seasons.

In our house, we wanted to replace the under-loved front courtyard with a basic vegetable garden that will produce some winter greens. We’re only talking about a small urban space here, but it’s amazing how much you can produce from that, and just how much it improves the look of the space.

First, we built a simple raised bed: 1.8m x 1.4m, and around 20cm deep. Minimal tools were required, as the hardware store cut the wood to size for us, so we just had to screw some brackets into each corner and dig them in with a basic hand trowel. We covered the existing dirt with some soaked cardboard as a weed and nutrient barrier before loading in the new potting mix (80%) and manure (20%).

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The next challenge was to work out what plants we wanted. We had an idea – leafy winter greens – however garden bed planning always runs into a challenge when you consider companions and enemies. Companion planting is especially important in shared beds, where plants can compete with each other, send each other out of balance, or strive for success together.

This process has always been quite manual and annoying. As soon as you start reading about one plant, you’ll quickly find that it’s not compatible with something else you had planned, and it’s back to rearranging everything again. My mother has slowly compiled the Excel-sheet-to-end-all-Excel-sheets, saving on browser-tab-fatigue, however it’s still a laborious process to apply to a brand new garden. (And that’s if you even know everything you want to plant in the first place!)

Of course, the solution has to pause here and build a simple Windows 10 app:

2017-02-27 Screenshot v1.2

Get it on Windows 10

As you drag-and-drop plants onto the bed planner, the app constantly recalculates what will and won’t be compatible.

The list of potential plants is automatically sorted to hint “Great Companions” and “Good Companions” first, and push those sneaky enemies to the bottom of the queue.

This also means that you can use it somewhat like Spotify Radio: just pick one plant you really want (say, basil), and drag it on to the bed planner. The list of potential plants will instantly suggest capsicum or tomatoes as the ideal plants to add next. Just keep adding from the top of the list and you’ll have a perfect garden in no time.

It also renders basic sizing and spacing information, so you can get an idea of what will actually fit in your space.

With the app built, our optimum winter garden is now well on its way to success. Hopefully yours can be too!

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⚠ Action Required: Revisit your Skype account security

The Really Really Short Version

If you don’t have time to read the full post below, these are the minimum steps you should follow to secure your Skype account:

  1. Visit https://account.microsoft.com
  2. If already signed in, sign out
  3. Sign in with your Skype account (old Skype username, not email or phone number)
  4. Follow the bouncing ball to completion

For the most complete fix, and a little background, read on.

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Software still at the heart of IoT

Earlier today, I was quoted in Drew Turney‘s Tech giants get ready for Internet of Things operating systems article for The Age.

The article explores the relevance of ‘dedicated’ IoT systems, like GE’s Predix.

I’d like to expand on this quote:

“The opportunity of IoT lies in integrating physical intelligence right through to business processes, and back out again”

Much of the current discussion around IoT is focussed on cheap sensors, platform interoperability, and data analytics. These are all important building blocks, but they don’t really talk to the power of IoT for me.

We’ve spent two decades mashing up databases. Disconnected datasets now annoy even our least technical friends.

We spent the last decade mashing up web services. It’s mind boggling that I can add a high-quality, interactive map with global coverage straight into an app, and then spend longer trying to generate all the different icon sizes required to publish it.

We’ll spend this decade mashing up the physical world. We’re nearing the point that it’s as easy to connect to your toothbrush as it is to connect to a web service.

Software remains at the heart of all this: it’s just that we can now reach further than ever before. Rather than waiting for input data, we can just go and get it. Rather than sending an alert, we can just go and start/stop/repair/move/etc. whatever we need to.

Separately, it was encouraging to see security raised several times. A device that’s too small and dumb to run the math required for encryption is probably not something to be exposed to the public internet.

And of course, it’s always nice to see Readify’s name alongside the likes of Intel, GE, and CSIRO. 🙂

Make one thing better, starting with your bed.

U.S. Navy Admiral Bill McRaven:

It was a simple task — mundane at best. But every morning we were required to make our bed to perfection. It seemed a little ridiculous at the time, particularly in light of the fact that were aspiring to be real warriors, tough battle hardened SEALs — but the wisdom of this simple act has been proven to me many times over. If you make your bed every morning you will have accomplished the first task of the day. It will give you a small sense of pride and it will encourage you to do another task and another and another. By the end of the day, that one task completed will have turned into many tasks completed. Making your bed will also reinforce the fact that little things in life matter. If you can’t do the little things right, you will never do the big things right. And, if by chance you have a miserable day, you will come home to a bed that is made — that you made — and a made bed gives you encouragement that tomorrow will be better. If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com.au/bill-mcraven-commencement-speech-at-ut-2014-5

Trialling Vame.me

Readify is a very culturally diverse organisation: a quick scan of my inbox right now shows names like Korczynski, Mutandwa, Shah, Saikovski and The. “Tatham” isn’t exactly simple either. We’re also distributed across many different client sites spread around the country, which means a lot of our conversation is via email.

I recently came across an Aussie startup called Vame.me, via a Shoestring article. I’m a sucker for well implemented simple ideas, so I gave it a go.

This is what my email signature now looks like, with an extra “Listen” link:


Tatham Oddie (Listen) | Readify Chief Information Officer | m +61 123 456 789 | tatham.oddie@readify.net | w readify.net

I like it, not because I’m precious about my own name (I’m really not), but because I like knowing how to pronounce other peoples’. There’s been a bit of adoption across Readify already, and I look forward to seeing it grow.

It’s hard to really tell how useful it is, as it’s not the type of thing people really call out a lot. I have been tracking click-throughs though, and it’s getting a few.

PS. If you’re wondering, here’s how you pronounce “The”: http://vame.me/ericthe

Nerd Corner: Convert a Mercurial (Hg) repo to Git, with full fidelity, on any OS

Fortunately or unfortunately, Git won over Mercurial. I placed a few bets on Mercurial at the time, so I have a bit of a tail of repositories left to convert.

Converting on Windows with full fidelity isn’t really possible. None of the scripts work well, and the case insensitive file system can cause issues. Luckily, Windows Azure makes it super easy to borrow a small Linux instance quickly.

I’ve documented what I do in this post. Anybody with a web browser can follow these steps, on any platform. There looks like a lot of steps, but that’s just because I’m spelling out every last detail for clarity.

Create a Linux VM in Windows Azure

  1. Sign in to https://manage.windowsazure.com
  2. Create a new VM from the gallery:
    Create VM from Gallery
  3. Choose an Ubuntu release. As of this post, I chose Ubuntu Server 13.10.
  4. Name the VM anything you want
  5. Untick “Upload compatible SSH key for authentication”, unless you know what you’re doing there
  6. Tick “Provide a password”
  7. Leave all the rest of the defaults, and just keep clicking Next
  8. Wait a moment for the VM to get provisioned

Connect to the VM

For this, we’ll just be connecting to a command line via SSH: no GUIs will be harmed.

Because SSH is so prevalent, there are tool chains available for every platform. I’m actually writing this post on my Surface RT (not Pro), using an app called SSH-RT from the Windows Store.

  1. Connect to the DNS name for your new VM (mine was git-convert.cloudapp.net)
  2. Use the username and password you established during the wizard
  3. You should now be at a command line like azureuser@git-convert:~$

Install Git and Hg on the VM

Ubuntu doesn’t ship with Git or Mercurial installed by default, but it does have an awesome package manager called apt-get.

  1. Run sudo apt-get install git
  2. Run sudo apt-get install mercurial

The sudo prefix is a command to elevate your permissions, kind of like a UAC prompt on Windows.

Clone hg-fast-export on to the VM

We’ll be using a tool called hg-fast-export to convert the Mercurial repository to Git, without having to replay each individual changeset like some tools do. This tool is in a Git repo, so we’ll just clone that repository down in order to get it onto the VM.

  1. Run git clone https://github.com/frej/fast-export.git

Clone your Mercurial repository on to the VM

For the sake of simplicity, we’re just going to use HTTPS instead of SSH.

  1. Run hg clone https://your/hg/repo/address

Export your Mercurial repository to a new Git one

  1. Create a new folder for your Git repository: mkdir your-repo-git
  2. Change to that folder: cd your-repo-git
  3. Initialize an empty Git repository there: git init
  4. Do the fast export: ../fast-export/hg-fast-export.sh -r ../your-repo/

Upload your Git repository to your Git hosting

  1. Add the remote: git remote add origin https://your/git/repo/address
  2. Push up all branches and tags: git push -u origin --all

Convert Hg-specifc config to Git

Take the opportunity now to convert your .hgignore file to an equivalent .gitignore one. You can go and do this back on your own machine.

Delete the VM

Back in the Azure Management Console, delete the VM. When you do this, choose to “delete the attached disks”. (It will ask you.)

All done!

You’re all done. Wasn’t that just a perfect, easy use of the cloud?